Ryan Heinsius

Executive Producer/Local Content Manager

Ryan joined KNAU's newsroom staff in 2013. He covers a broad range of stories from local, state and tribal politics to education, economy and public lands issues. Ryan also regularly interviews both internationally known and regional musicians, and is a frequent contributor to NPR News and National Native News.

Before making the leap to public radio, Ryan spent more than a decade in print media. As the longtime editor of an alternative weekly paper, he covered arts and culture and wrote about a broad range of topics in a weekly column. 

He earned his bachelor’s degree from Northern Arizona University in political science and journalism, and has returned to teach at his alma mater. 

Ryan is also a Flagstaff-based musician and has performed and recorded with many bands in the Southwest. He spends as much time as possible with his wife and daughter hiking and cycling the amazing terrain of northern Arizona.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy

2017 was the deadliest year in the last decade on Arizona roads. That’s according to an annual survey conducted by the Arizona Department of Transportation. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 


Mohave Valley Irrigation and Drainage District

The Mohave County Board of Supervisors is concerned some water rights to the Colorado River could be transferred elsewhere under a plan by western Arizona farmers. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the board is calling on federal and state officials to intervene. 


Ryan Heinsius

Arizona Governor Doug Ducey today declared a state of emergency for Coconino County following recent heavy monsoon flooding near Flagstaff. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it allocates $200,000 for ongoing recovery efforts. 


azdragonfly.org

The U.S. House Monday passed a bill to finalize a federal water settlement with the White Mountain Apache Tribe. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it’ll help provide a long-term water source on the Fort Apache Indian Reservation.


Chicago Zoological Society

Twenty five environmental groups are calling on federal wildlife officials to release three captive-raised Mexican gray wolf packs into the wild. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, they say the endangered population needs increased genetic diversity to survive.


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