Ryan Heinsius

Executive Producer/Local Content Manager

Ryan joined KNAU's newsroom staff in 2013. He covers a broad range of stories from local, state and tribal politics to education, economy and public lands issues. Ryan also regularly interviews both internationally known and regional musicians, and is a frequent contributor to NPR News and National Native News.

Before making the leap to public radio, Ryan spent more than a decade in print media. As the longtime editor of an alternative weekly paper, he covered arts and culture and wrote about a broad range of topics in a weekly column. 

He earned his bachelor’s degree from Northern Arizona University in political science and journalism, and has returned to teach at his alma mater. 

Ryan is also a Flagstaff-based musician and has performed and recorded with many bands in the Southwest. He spends as much time as possible with his wife and daughter hiking and cycling the amazing terrain of northern Arizona.

Ways to Connect

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has allocated nearly $900,000 to the Navajo Nation for the cleanup of abandoned uranium mines. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it’s the latest effort to remediate hundreds of sites on the reservation.


Courtesy

Today is the deadline for the Trump administration to reunite thousands of migrant children with their families after being detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement. The Justice Department says it’s unlikely that deadline will be met. 


Ryan Heinsius

Saturday marks five years since 19 Granite Mountain Hotshots were killed fighting the Yarnell Hill Fire. To honor them, the City of Prescott, where the men were based, will unveil a tribute center. It’s very personal. It features biographies and photos of the fallen crew, and thousands of items left by the grieving public at the hotshots’ fire station. In this audio postcard, we hear from some of the people who designed the tribute center.


Navajo Nation

A dozen new Navajo Nation police officers will be sworn in Friday in Chinle. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, they’re the first graduates of the Navajo Police Training Academy in 10 years. 


vineyardscottonwood.com

The indictment followed an investigation by the Arizona Department of Health Services. It revealed untrained personnel took water samples and didn’t follow other testing and paperwork procedures. Cottonwood officials voluntarily gave up the city’s laboratory license, and say they’re now in compliance with state standards.


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