Earth Notes

The Colorado Plateau is one of North America’s human and environmental treasures. Ancient cultures have called this land of sun-baked deserts and lush mountain landscapes home for centuries. Earth Notes, KNAU’s weekly environmental series, explores the Plateau by telling stories of the intricate relationships between environmental issues and our daily lives.

Rooted in science and wrapped in human interest, the two minute long segments encourage listeners to think of themselves as part of the solution to environmental problems. Upbeat and informative, the program tries to foster hope and dampen despair about the environment, and motivate listeners to become more conscious and informed stewards of the Colorado Plateau.

Wind Cave National Park

They’re getting used to grazing on shortgrass instead of tallgrass, and will soon be searching for places to give birth to their young. A herd of bison is settling in for its first year in a new home at the Raymond Wildlife Area east of Flagstaff. 


Earth Notes: American Pikas

Feb 28, 2018
Dyer Lytle

Hikers in the high mountains of the West have long been charmed by the sight of American pikas peeking out of rocks in talus fields above treeline. 


New Mexico History Museum

In 1846, U.S. soldiers swept down the Santa Fe trail to seize the province of New Mexico for the United States. Santa Fe was then part of Mexico, and for a time during this war soldiers camped in the roomy courtyard at the city’s Palace of the Governors. One soldier wrote an evocative description that includes mention of baking ovens there.


Earth Notes: Plant Galls

Feb 14, 2018
Gary Alpert

Lots of plants bear strange-looking swellings on their leaves and stems. These wart-like growths are called galls, and they’re the direct result of mites and insects injecting chemicals into the plant’s tissue during rapid cell division.


Earth Notes: Tough Dirt

Feb 7, 2018
Jim Harrigan, NRCS

The Colorado Plateau is a land of constant discovery—both above and beneath our feet. Recently a surprising soil was unearthed that fit a previously empty slot in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s established soil classification system. 

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