eclipse

In the 19th century the United States was not yet a nation of scientists. But when a total solar eclipse swept the western frontier in 1878, astronomers rushed to prove they could make a mark on the world with new inventions and startling discoveries. Eclipse chaser and former NPR correspondent David Baron tells that story in his latest book American Eclipse. He spoke with KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny.


NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

A total lunar eclipse will be visible tomorrow (Jan. 31) before dawn. It’s taking place during an unusual time in the lunar cycle, giving it the name of a “super blue blood moon”. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Melissa Sevigny

Today’s full solar eclipse was the first in 100 years to stretch from coast to coast in the U.S. Millions of people flocked to the 70-mile-wide path of totality, and one of them is KNAU’s science reporter Melissa Sevigny. She’s on the line with me from Madras, Ore., which was in the center of the path of totality.


NPS/Erin Whittaker

Every state in America will witness at least a partial solar eclipse today. In Arizona the celestial show starts at about 9:15 this morning and ends at noon. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


NASA

On Monday the long-anticipated “Great American Eclipse” will cross the country coast-to-coast from Oregon to South Carolina. Scientists will watch the sun vanish behind the moon using telescopes on the ground and from weather balloons and planes. But what are they looking for? KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with Lowell Observatory astronomer Gerard van Belle about science that can only be done during a total solar eclipse.

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