Music

Timothy Duffy

Singer-songwriter Dom Flemons’ newest album, Black Cowboys, takes a rarely seen look into a nearly lost piece American history. Its 18 tracks are a mix of originals, traditional folk tunes, and many seldom-heard songs that chronicle the role played by African-Americans in settling the West after emancipation in the 19th century. Flemons’ is a fifth-generation Arizonan and a former Flagstaff resident, and tomorrow he returns as one of the headliners at Pickin’ in the Pines. For the latest installment of KNAU’s series Eats and Beats, I had a chance to talk with Flemons about the very personal genesis of Black Cowboys.


Rebel Sol Fam

Cottonwood singer-songwriter Keith Okie is set to release his debut album, Runnin’ With Rockers, with his band Rebel Sol tonight. It chronicles the struggles and joys of life over 10 tracks of modern reggae grooves, and also reflects Okie’s deep conviction in the virtues of positivity and love. In the latest installment of KNAU’s series Eats and Beats, Okie discusses his style and the philosophical foundations of his music.


Courtesy of Lucky Lenny

Tonight Flagstaff kicks off a yearlong party leading up to next year’s 50th anniversary of the first Apollo moon landing. Every astronaut who ever walked on the Moon spent time training here. Part of tonight’s celebration is a performance by the band Lucky Lenny. They will perform a bluegrass version of Pink Floyd’s “The Dark Side of the Moon.”  In the latest installment of Eats and Beats, we hear musician Shawn Dennehy talk about reimagining the iconic 1973 album.


Ryan Heinsius

It’s not unusual for local elected officials to have second jobs. But they’re not all as cool as Flagstaff Mayor Coral Evans’ moonlighting gig as a DJ. Every Friday night for the last few years Evans, also known as DJ Baby Shady, has been spinning tunes at the Arizona Roadhouse in east Flagstaff. In the latest installment of KNAU’s series Eats and Beats, Mayor Evans queues up some of her favorite songs in the DJ booth.


Beverly Shumway

It was pretty apparent early in his life that Ryan David Orr was destined to be a musician. He began writing and performing original music at 13, and has since lived all over the country honing what he calls his impressionistic style of folk music. Now based in Pinetop-Lakeside, he writes and records on the same property he once shared with his mother, one of his biggest influences. For the latest installment of our series Eats and Beats, Ryan David Orr shares the evolution of his deeply personal music.


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