psychology

Mark Henle/Arizona Republic

Today marks three years since a shooting on Northern Arizona University’s campus left three students injured and one dead. In the days that followed, NAU psychologist Heidi Wayment surveyed students to learn how they responded—with grief, depression, or anxiety—and also what helped them heal. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with Wayment about her recently published findings.


We all react differently to seeing someone in distress. Some feel empathy. Some don’t. Some feel the pain so strongly they take it on as their own. Flagstaff social neuroscientist Chad Woodruff is trying to measure compassion and empathy by recording the activity of “mirror” or “social neurons” in the brain. 


Ryan Heinsius

The Grand Canyon has the dubious distinction of having one of the highest rates of suicide among national parks. While they are destinations for millions of sightseers each year, some people arrive with the intention of ending their lives. During this National Suicide Prevention Week, KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, that victims, families, and first responders at parks all experience the ripple effects of suicide and suicide attempts.


Melissa Sevigny

There’s a map on the wall of the Cameron community center on the Navajo Nation with nearly one hundred red dots scattered all over it. They mark abandoned uranium mines. More than 500 of these mines exist on the reservation. They’re linked to cancer and other potentially deadly illnesses. But nobody knows the extent of the emotional trauma of living on land that’s contaminated. That’s the focus of a new project to raise awareness and bring healing through art.

This week marks one year since four students were shot, one fatally, on Northern Arizona University’s Flagstaff campus. Now researchers are using the shooting as a case study to see if Twitter can reveal how communities respond to traumatic events.