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Arizona researchers are one step closer to developing a valley fever vaccine

CDC-Valley Fever Map
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
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Valley fever is most commonly found in the southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico and dogs are particularly susceptible.

Researchers at the University of Arizona College of Medicine are one step closer to coming up with a canine vaccine against Valley Fever. A U-of-A-led study shows the vaccine provides a high level of protection against the fungus that causes Valley Fever. The disease is airborne and primarily affects the lungs. It’s most commonly found in the southwestern U.S. and northwestern Mexico. Dogs are particularly susceptible to Valley Fever. This is the first study to examine a potential vaccine for them. It’s unknown at this point how long immunity will last, but researchers are optimistic it’ll pave the way for research for a human vaccine.