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Prince Charles edits British Black newspaper 'The Voice'

In this Monday, March 9, 2020, photo, Britain's Prince Charles and Camilla the Duchess of Cornwall, in the background, leave after attending the annual Commonwealth Day service at Westminster Abbey in London. The Prince of Wales has edited an edition of British African-Caribbean newspaper "The Voice" to mark its 40-year anniversary.
Kirsty Wigglesworth
/
AP
In this Monday, March 9, 2020, photo, Britain's Prince Charles and Camilla the Duchess of Cornwall, in the background, leave after attending the annual Commonwealth Day service at Westminster Abbey in London. The Prince of Wales has edited an edition of British African-Caribbean newspaper "The Voice" to mark its 40-year anniversary.

LONDON — The Prince of Wales has edited an edition of British African-Caribbean newspaper "The Voice" to mark its 40-year anniversary.

Prince Charles, the heir to the British throne, said he "was so touched" to be asked to edit the edition, which will feature interviews with movie star Idris Elba and Baroness Doreen Lawrence, the campaigning mother of Stephen Lawrence, who was murdered in a racist attack in 1993.

Elba, the Black British actor who starred in "The Wire" and several Marvel movies, tells the weekly newspaper, due to be published on Sept. 1, that a grant from Charles' youth charity, The Prince's Trust, at age 16 "opened doors that changed my life."

Baroness Lawrence will describe a new partnership between the Stephen Lawrence Day Foundation and The Prince's Foundation, another charity, to provide applied arts scholarships for young people from diverse backgrounds affected by social and economic inequality.

Speaking about the publication, Charles said: "Over the last four decades, with all the enormous changes that they have witnessed, Britain's only surviving black newspaper has become an institution and a crucial part of the fabric of our society.

"This is why I was so touched to be invited to edit this special edition."

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The Associated Press