Melissa Sevigny

Science & Technology Reporter

Melissa grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where she fell in love with the ecology and geology of the Sonoran desert. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona and an M.FA. in Creative Writing and Environment from Iowa State University. Her first book, Mythical River, forthcoming from the University of Iowa Press, is about water issues in the Southwest. She has worked as a science communicator for NASA’s Phoenix Mars Scout Mission, the Water Resources Research Center, and the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Melissa relocated to Flagstaff in 2015 to join KNAU’s team. She enjoys hiking, fishing and reading fantasy novels.

Ways to Connect

Arizona’s high country has seen some recent snowfall with more on the way. But much of the state remains in “exceptional” drought status. That’s been hard on wildlife. Natural ponds and stock tanks have dried up. A nonprofit group of hunters and conservationists is trying to help by refilling those watering holes for the benefit of elk and other animals. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with Steve Clark, executive director of the Arizona Elk Society, about the program.

Victor Leshyk and Katharyn Duffy

A new study published last week shows Earth’s ecosystems are fast losing their ability to soak up extra carbon from the atmosphere. Scientists collected data about how plants take up carbon all over the globe and found the warming planet could reach a critical tipping point in the next two or three decades, when many ecosystems no longer act as “sinks” for carbon and become sources instead. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with lead author Katharyn Duffy of Northern Arizona University about her findings.

SELF Magazine

Coconino County has distributed almost five thousand doses of the coronavirus vaccine and is awaiting the next shipment. The county’s goal is to get a vaccine to everyone who wants one, but it’s currently struggling with high demand and a bottleneck in supply. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with Kim Musselman, interim director of Coconino County Health and Human Services.


Coconino National Forest

The U.S. Forest Service has released a long-awaited management plan for Fossil Creek in central Arizona, a popular recreation site which is home to many rare and threatened species. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Henry Grover

Wildfires have grown larger and more severe in recent decades. They strip the soil of vegetation and make it vulnerable to erosion and floods. But there’s hope for healing a landscape after it burns—and it comes from humble moss.

Pages