Museum Fire Smoke Impacts

Jul 22, 2019

Credit David Kraz

The Museum Fire burning near Flagstaff is pumping large amounts of smoke into the atmosphere. Efficient summertime ventilation has kept health impacts to a minimum thus far as the plumes are dispersing as they travel north and east of the fire. So far, there have been no health advisories issued by Arizona Department of Air Quality (ADEQ) or the National Weather Service. This can change with the varying conditions and those with sensitivities to smoke are encouraged to stay alert and informed. Monday night, light northerly winds are forecast to bring smoke into Flagstaff communities.

Learn more about the effects of wildfire smoke on your health.

The following is taken from the ADEQ website.

Particulate matter is a component of smoke from wildfires and consists of fine particles such as soot and ash that can reach deep into the lungs and may contain irritating and toxic compounds. Some of the symptoms related to exposure to smoke from wildfires include:

  • Eye, nose, mouth and/or throat irritation; 
  • Coughing;
  • Trouble breathing;
  • Tightness of the chest;
  • and/or The onset of symptoms related to pre-existing respiratory ailments like asthma or emphysema.

If smoke from wildfires is affecting you and your family consider some of the following actions:

  • If you smell smoke and/or are beginning to experience symptoms, consider temporarily locating to another area as long as it is safe for you to do so.
  • Move indoors and stay there with doors and windows closed.
  • Run the air conditioning, the fan feature on your home heating system with the heat turned off.
  • The filtration systems on home systems can provide some benefit.
  • Run room air filtration units.
  • Reduce your physical activity level. Do not exercise.

If symptoms persist or become more severe, please contact your primary health care provider - even persons considered healthy can experience symptoms when exposed to smoke from wildfires!

These population groups considered especially at risk from exposure to smoke from wildfires:

  • Elderly persons;
  • Young children (especially children 7 and under);
  • Individuals with pre-existing health conditions like asthma, emphysema, and cardiovascular disease;
  • and Individuals with respiratory infections like colds or flu.

Stay informed of Arizona Wildfires | View Fire Weather Forecast >