All Things Considered

Weekdays from 3:30 to 6. Repeating nightly at 10 on News/Talk

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the more than four decades since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Ailsa ChangAudie CornishMary Louise Kelly, and Ari Shapiro. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, which is hosted by Michel Martin.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators.

  

Say WeWork and one person comes to mind: Adam Neumann, the lanky founder and former CEO with flowing black hair and a rock-star persona who would carry on about the "energy" of the company's communal work spaces.

He also embraced a "party-boy life style," said Eliot Brown, whose new book with co-author Maureen Farrell, The Cult of We: WeWork and the Great Start-Up Delusion, was published on Tuesday.

Well before noon, Neumann was known to offer potential investors shots of tequila from a bottle he kept behind his desk.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Office sharing company WeWork was once the darling of Silicon Valley. In 2019, though, it went from the second most valuable U.S. startup to the brink of collapse. Now as remote work grows, the company is launching its second act. NPR's Bobby Allyn reports.

BOBBY ALLYN, BYLINE: Say WeWork, and one person comes to mind - Adam Neumann, the lanky former CEO with flowing black hair who went all woo-woo about the energy of the company's workspaces, like here at a 2017 conference in Washington.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Office sharing company WeWork was once the darling of Silicon Valley. In 2019, though, it went from the second most valuable U.S. startup to the brink of collapse. Now as remote work grows, the company is launching its second act. NPR's Bobby Allyn reports.

BOBBY ALLYN, BYLINE: Say WeWork, and one person comes to mind - Adam Neumann, the lanky former CEO with flowing black hair who went all woo-woo about the energy of the company's workspaces, like here at a 2017 conference in Washington.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

In a first since President Biden took office, the Biden administration has transferred a detainee at the U.S. military prison in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, to Morocco, signaling a renewed effort to shrink the highly controversial prison's population — and possibly close it entirely.

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