Arizona Department of Game and Fish

Chicago Zoological Society

Mexican gray wolves were once common throughout the southwest United States and into central Mexico. But their populations were decimated in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as human settlement exploded. Prey decline, habitat degradation, and federal predator control programs all but wiped out the animals. By the 1970s, Mexican wolves had almost completely disappeared from the wild.


Don Burkett/The Wildlife Society

Arizona ranchers can now apply for grants as part of an effort to research measures that could prevent conflicts between livestock and Mexican gray wolves.

Wikicommons

Wildlife officials are still working to figure out the impact of a planned release of more than 9 billion gallons (34.1 billion liters) of water from Alamo Dam.

USFWS

Federal wildlife officials have released a draft proposal outlining next year’s plans for Mexican gray wolf releases in the Southwest. It focuses on placing captive-born pups in wild dens to increase genetic diversity. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 


www.arizona-leisure.com

The Arizona Game and Fish Department says it is launching a new "eagle cam" next month so wildlife watchers can safely follow the nesting season of bald eagles.

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