astronomy

NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI

In the last few years, Pluto has gone from being a fuzzy dot in the sky to a geologically active world of mountains, canyons, and heart-shaped glaciers. That’s thanks to NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft, which sailed by Pluto in 2015 to photograph it up close for the first time. The mission’s leader Alan Stern is currently on a book tour and visits Flagstaff today. He spoke with KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny from the road.


Milliken Lab/Brown University

Flagstaff planetary scientist Christopher Edwards has detected water all over the moon, which could mean new possibilities for space travel using the moon as a basecamp.


sci-news.com

Astronomers at Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff have discovered a rare runaway star: a yellow supergiant. It’s the first time humans have ever observed one as it’s speeding through its galaxy at 300,000 miles per hour—so fast, it could cover the distance between L.A. and New York in 30 seconds. Here’s Lowell astronomer Phil Massey.


NASA/JPL-Caltech

Arizona astronomers are building a spacecraft the size and shape of a shoebox to learn more about potentially habitable planets beyond our solar system. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Melissa Sevigny

Two new books chronicle Flagstaff’s long history with everybody’s favorite dwarf planet, Pluto. It was discovered at Lowell Observatory in 1930 and it’s been the toast of the town ever since. Local scientists have been involved with nearly every major Pluto discovery, including the recent flyby by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny brought the authors of the new books into the studio to have a conversation about why they think little Pluto is a big deal for Flagstaff.

Pages