Earth Notes

The Colorado Plateau is one of North America’s human and environmental treasures. Ancient cultures have called this land of sun-baked deserts and lush mountain landscapes home for centuries. Earth Notes, KNAU’s weekly environmental series, explores the Plateau by telling stories of the intricate relationships between environmental issues and our daily lives.

Rooted in science and wrapped in human interest, the two minute long segments encourage listeners to think of themselves as part of the solution to environmental problems. Upbeat and informative, the program tries to foster hope and dampen despair about the environment, and motivate listeners to become more conscious and informed stewards of the Colorado Plateau.

Wade Ward, APS

Millions of birds are killed every year by electrical power lines—especially in the wide-open country of the Colorado Plateau where power lines and poles are often all that’s available for birds to nest and roost on.

Jennifer Frey

It’s not easy to spot the New Mexico jumping mouse, a golden-furred critter that lives along streams in the Southwest. It’s rare, quick, and secretive. To find the animal, scientists have built a new kind of mousetrap—one that doesn’t hurt the mice at all, but tricks them into leaving inky footprints behind.  


Used by permission, Utah State Historical Society

Western writer and historian Juanita Leavitt Brooks was forever and always a child of the frontier. She was born in 1898 in Bunkerville, just barely in Nevada, across the border from southwestern Arizona and Utah.

Earth Notes: Rezcycling

Jul 31, 2019
Jack Pongyesva

There’s  no curbside recycling for the twelve villages that make up the Hopi reservation. That’s mainly because of remoteness and sheer distance from potential buyers of recyclable materials. But, a brother and sister team are trying to change that.


Earth Notes: Pipestone—Red Argillite

Jul 24, 2019
Museum of Northern Arizona

For centuries, Native Americans have cherished a compact, fine-grained clay called pipestone. Its common name comes from their use of larger pieces of it to carve ceremonial pipes. 

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