Earth Notes

The Colorado Plateau is one of North America’s human and environmental treasures. Ancient cultures have called this land of sun-baked deserts and lush mountain landscapes home for centuries. Earth Notes, KNAU’s weekly environmental series, explores the Plateau by telling stories of the intricate relationships between environmental issues and our daily lives.

Rooted in science and wrapped in human interest, the two minute long segments encourage listeners to think of themselves as part of the solution to environmental problems. Upbeat and informative, the program tries to foster hope and dampen despair about the environment, and motivate listeners to become more conscious and informed stewards of the Colorado Plateau.

Yavapai County Food Recovery Program

The linked problems of food waste and food insecurity are common in the U.S. In northern Arizona’s Yavapai County, public health experts estimate some 80,000 people are food insecure, including one in three children and one in six seniors. They can’t always count on regular or nutritious meals.


U.S. Forest Service

The Colorado Plateau is a place often thirsty for rain. But some of the soils in the region are water-phobic.


Earth Notes: Stoic Cider

Oct 2, 2019
Stoic Cider

The best cider starts with heirloom varieties of apples. At least that’s what Kanin Routson prefers. Kanin, along with his wife Tierney, brother Cody and sister in law Claire, operate Stoic Cider on a farm near Prescott, Ariz.


Earth Notes: Leslie Goodding

Sep 25, 2019
Aven Nelson Papers, American Heritage Center, University of Wyoming

In May 1902 a young man with a black beard and tousled hair stood beside the Muddy River in a place later submerged by the waters of Lake Mead. Leslie Goodding inspected an unusual willow tree there—shrubby with long, slender branches and festooned with dangling, pale-yellow catkins. He cut a few sprigs from the tree and clamped them into his wooden plant press.  

Kevin Dahl/National Parks and Conservation Association

Helium is the second most abundant element in the universe. But here on Earth it’s in much shorter supply. As demand has increased, companies have aggressively ramped up helium exploration in the U.S.—including northern Arizona.


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