Earth Notes

The Colorado Plateau is one of North America’s human and environmental treasures. Ancient cultures have called this land of sun-baked deserts and lush mountain landscapes home for centuries. Earth Notes, KNAU’s weekly environmental series, explores the Plateau by telling stories of the intricate relationships between environmental issues and our daily lives.

Rooted in science and wrapped in human interest, the two minute long segments encourage listeners to think of themselves as part of the solution to environmental problems. Upbeat and informative, the program tries to foster hope and dampen despair about the environment, and motivate listeners to become more conscious and informed stewards of the Colorado Plateau.

Diane Hope

In recent decades northern leopard frogs have become refugees in their own land.

Andrey Atuchin, Virginia Tech

The Triassic period was a time of giants on Earth: lumbering reptiles with armored plates, and fifteen-foot-long crocodiles. The fossils of these extinct beasts are preserved in the rainbow-colored rocks of the Petrified Forest National Park in northern Arizona. But the same rocks hold the secrets of tiny creatures too.

Earth Notes: Certified School Garden

Aug 28, 2019
FUSD

Studies show that kids who garden perform better in science, eat healthier and develop a strong sense of social and emotional well-being. But the harvests of school gardens often can’t be served in the cafeteria because of health codes. A Farm-to-School initiative in Arizona aims to change that by allowing harvests from school gardens and locally grown foods to be used in campus meal programs.


Wade Ward, APS

Millions of birds are killed every year by electrical power lines—especially in the wide-open country of the Colorado Plateau where power lines and poles are often all that’s available for birds to nest and roost on.

Jennifer Frey

It’s not easy to spot the New Mexico jumping mouse, a golden-furred critter that lives along streams in the Southwest. It’s rare, quick, and secretive. To find the animal, scientists have built a new kind of mousetrap—one that doesn’t hurt the mice at all, but tricks them into leaving inky footprints behind.  


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