Ecological Restoration Institute

Courtesy of ERI

The main architect of northern Arizona’s Four Forest Restoration Initiative is set to retire later this month. Wally Covington, a forestry professor at Northern Arizona University, has been a pioneer of modern forest management for more than five decades. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Ryan Heinsius / KNAU

Large-scale forest restoration in northern Arizona is behind schedule. One of the major hurdles is that there are very few places for low-value logs and slash to go once it’s cut. It’s known as the “biomass bottleneck,” but a new pilot program spearheaded by Northern Arizona University’s Ecological Restoration Institute aims to tap wood markets on the other side of the globe, and hopefully reduce the chances catastrophic wildfire back home. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


USDA Forest Service photograph

Ten miles north of Flagstaff is the oldest experimental forest in the United States. It was established more than 100 years ago at a time when foresters wanted to know how to encourage ponderosa pines to grow. Now, scientists use Fort Valley to study the opposite problem: how to thin the overcrowded woods. It took decades of research to bring about that shift in thinking. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, it all started with one man and two mules.

Tom Brown, USFS Coconino National Forest

The U.S. Forest Service allowed fire to burn more than 73,500 acres in northern Arizona last year. New research examines how well these “managed wildfires” restore healthy, historic conditions to ponderosa pine forests.  


Ryan Heinsius

Officials with the U.S. Forest Service and the City of Flagstaff have signed off on the final draft of the Flagstaff Watershed Protection Project. It’s designed to thin National Forest land surrounding the city and safeguard it from the effects of catastrophic wildfire. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Pages