Endangered Species

Endangered Wolf Center on Facebook

Missouri wildlife officials have placed six Mexican wolf pups born in captivity near St. Louis with two packs in the wild, in a new effort to repopulate the critically endangered species.

Dan Sorensen / Western Rivers Conservancy

The Tonto National Forest has grown by 150 acres, thanks to the purchase of former ranchland near Payson along the East Verde River. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.

Nagel Photography/Shutterstock

Biologists with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine have declared that the Mexican gray wolf is a valid subspecies. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it strengthens the case for keeping the animal’s federally endangered status.


endangeredwolfcenter.org

Two endangered Mexican wolves have been removed from the wild and are undergoing testing to determine if they're behind a string of livestock deaths in southwestern New Mexico, marking the latest wrinkle in the strained effort to return the predators to the American Southwest.

US Moves to Lift Remaining Gray Wolf Protections

Mar 14, 2019
U.S. Forest Service via AP, File

Gray wolves in the U.S. would be stripped of federal protection and subject to hunting and trapping in more states under a proposal released Thursday that declares the predators recovered following a decades-long restoration effort.

BLM

When people think of sage-grouse, they may think of them as birds of far northern valleys swathed in grey-green sagebrush. But there’s a distinct—and lesser-known—species that lives south of the Colorado River in Utah and Colorado. It’s the Gunnison sage-grouse, a smaller cousin of the greater sage-grouse.


Ryan Heinsius

Grand Canyon National Park officials held a community meeting Wednesday about the federal government shutdown. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, employees and residents voiced a variety concerns. 


Chicago Zoological Society

Mexican gray wolves were once common throughout the southwest United States and into central Mexico. But their populations were decimated in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as human settlement exploded. Prey decline, habitat degradation, and federal predator control programs all but wiped out the animals. By the 1970s, Mexican wolves had almost completely disappeared from the wild.


Don Burkett/The Wildlife Society

Arizona ranchers can now apply for grants as part of an effort to research measures that could prevent conflicts between livestock and Mexican gray wolves.

ABQ BioPark website

Albuquerque's zoo has received another Mexican gray wolf as part of an international recovery effort that includes breeding the endangered animals in captivity to ensure their genetic viability.

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