Endangered Species

Jim Rorabaugh/USFWS

The southwestern willow flycatcher will remain on the endangered species list, following a review of its status as a unique subspecies. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


KTAR

A wolf that once roamed parts of the American Southwest and northern Mexico would be removed from the list of federally protected species under legislation proposed by U.S. Sen. Jeff Flake.

Mark Henle/The Arizona Republic

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service last month released its long-awaited recovery plan for endangered Mexican gray wolves. Now a national wildlife advocacy group has listed the animals as one of the most threatened in the U.S. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

AZ PUBLIC MEDIA

An effort to bring one of the world's largest birds back from the brink of extinction is expanding after northern Arizona and southern Utah found some success in getting deer hunters to use ammunition not made of lead.

Eric Brekke, BLM

Forest managers want to restore fire to northern Arizona’s ecosystems, and a tiny owl is a big player in that plan. For the first time, state biologists have designed an experiment to learn how the threatened Mexican Spotted Owl responds to prescribed burns. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Michael Chow/The Arizona Republic

State wildlife managers have released a study highlighting the historical range of endangered Mexican gray wolves. It contends the animal’s territory was almost entirely in Mexico, but as KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, some conservation groups are skeptical of the findings. 


AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

In a remote, rugged valley overlooking the Pacific Ocean, researchers closely monitor an endangered icon: the California condor.

Bruce Taubert

State officials say Arizona's population of bald eagles is doing well.

The Game and Fish Department's annual survey reports an increasing number of breeding areas statewide, with a record 82 young hatched during the 2017 breeding season, up from the previous high of 79 in 2016.

www.czs.org

Environmentalists are asking that federal wildlife managers release more captive Mexican gray wolves into the wild in New Mexico to help with recovery of the endangered species.

Steve Hillebrand, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Arizona and Sonora, Mexico are one ecosystem—a diverse and rugged desert—but they’re split by hundreds of miles of fences and vehicle barriers. Scientists want to know how the current U.S.-Mexico border wall affects wildlife, and what will happen if that barrier is made more impenetrable. As KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, doing research in this region is fraught with complications.

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