environment

Arizona Department of Water Resources

Governor Doug Ducey signed legislation this week to establish new clean water rules, following a rollback of federal protections for ephemeral waterways last year. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.

National Park Service

Here’s a fish story for you: what if you could get paid to go fishing all day? The National Park Service wants anglers to help get rid of exotic brown trout at Lees Ferry on the Colorado River. The agency is giving cash prizes for every fish to try to knock down their numbers. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, the program is an unusual experiment, designed to meet the goals of the Park Service but also respect the spiritual beliefs of the Zuni Tribe.

Courtesy

In January the Biden-Harris administration announced the creation of the White House Environmental Justice Advisory Council. It’s made up of more than two-dozen leaders from communities across the country that suffer disproportionate levels of pollution and related health and economic problems. They’ve been tasked with advising the administration and making policy suggestions on a range of environmental issues that have historically impacted many tribal lands and communities of color. Havasupai councilwoman Carletta Tilousi was recently appointed to the White House council and spoke with KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius.


Ryan Heinsius / KNAU

The U.S. House of Representatives recently passed a conservation package that includes a bill to ban new uranium mining claims on more than a million acres near Grand Canyon National Park. Proponents have long argued uranium extraction threatens the canyon’s watershed and environment along with the public health of the Navajo, Hopi and Havasupai tribes. Democratic Arizona Congressman Raúl Grijalva has spearheaded several attempts to make federal protections permanent near the park. He spoke with KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius about the newest bill and the legacy of uranium mining.


U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

A recent report from Colorado River experts says it’s time for radical new management strategies to safeguard the Southwest’s water supplies. It’s meant to inform discussions on how to renegotiate certain parts of the Law of the River that will expire in 2026. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke about the report with Jack Schmidt, director of the Center for Colorado River Studies at Utah State University.


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