forest

Melissa Sevigny

It’s common now to see smoke in the air around Northern Arizona in the fall. Prescribed burns have become the norm for managing forests—especially around Flagstaff, which is a national model for forest management in an age of megafires. But nationwide, there’s a shortage of people qualified to do those burns, and funding is limited. The Nature Conservancy is trying to fill that gap by offering training for future “Burn Bosses.”  KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Brady Smith, Coconino National Forest

The U.S. Forest Service is proposing to expand its list of projects that don’t require environmental review. The agency says the change is needed to make forest restoration among other things more efficient, but critics say it eliminates public involvement. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Melissa Sevigny

Sending kids to Camp Colton at the base of the San Francisco Peaks has been a local tradition since the seventies. Thousands of sixth grade students have learned about science and nature there. But this spring there’s a new curriculum focused on forest health and wildfire prevention. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke about it with Ari Wilder, the executive director of Friends of Camp Colton.

USDA Forest Service photograph

Ten miles north of Flagstaff is the oldest experimental forest in the United States. It was established more than 100 years ago at a time when foresters wanted to know how to encourage ponderosa pines to grow. Now, scientists use Fort Valley to study the opposite problem: how to thin the overcrowded woods. It took decades of research to bring about that shift in thinking. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, it all started with one man and two mules.

Melissa Sevigny

A report from a nonprofit institute says forest restoration initiatives generated $150 million dollars for northern Arizona’s economy in 2017. The study was conducted to meet a Congressional requirement for monitoring the results of large-scale restoration projects. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.

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