forest fire

Scott Berger/Associated Press

Airport officials in some western states are concerned sporadic fuel shortages may hamper aerial firefighting operations. Planes and helicopters are critical in fighting wildfires raging across the West. Fire managers, however, say the problem is not widespread…or new. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Melissa Sevigny

Streets in east Flagstaff filled with mud and debris this week as flash floods poured down from the Museum Fire scar. The two-year-old burn scar is a study site for scientists at Northern Arizona University, who want to know how forests will recover from wildfires in a warmer, drier climate. Just before the flooding, KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny took a tour of the spot to learn about the experiment.


AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

Firefighters are tamping down on recent record-breaking wildfires in California. But KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, scientists say bigger and more frequent blazes are here to stay.

Shaula Hedwall

The Museum Fire burned nearly two thousand acres north of Flagstaff last July. The area is home to a federally threatened species, the Mexican Spotted Owl, and the fire affected three patches of habitat set aside for them, called Protected Activity Centers. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with two wildlife biologists about how the owls are doing now, Shaula Hedwall of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Julia Camps of the Coconino National Forest.

Melissa Sevigny

It’s common now to see smoke in the air around Northern Arizona in the fall. Prescribed burns have become the norm for managing forests—especially around Flagstaff, which is a national model for forest management in an age of megafires. But nationwide, there’s a shortage of people qualified to do those burns, and funding is limited. The Nature Conservancy is trying to fill that gap by offering training for future “Burn Bosses.”  KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


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