forest

Melissa Sevigny

Yesterday we heard about northern Arizona’s tree thinning projects and who makes the decision on which trees to cut. In part 2 of that story, what happens to those trees afterward? Flagstaff has always been a logging town, but things have changed. When the U.S. Forest Service began to thin the woods almost a decade ago reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires, some thought it would bring a second economic boom for the logging industry. As KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, that heyday hasn’t happened.

Melissa Sevigny

Northern Arizona is home to the largest ponderosa pine forest in the world. If you’ve ever hiked through it, you’ve probably seen trees marked with brightly colored paint. That paint is a kind of map for the logging companies that thin the woods and make them more fire-resistant. But which trees get to stay and which have to go—and who makes those decisions? KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Eric Brekke, BLM

Forest managers want to restore fire to northern Arizona’s ecosystems, and a tiny owl is a big player in that plan. For the first time, state biologists have designed an experiment to learn how the threatened Mexican Spotted Owl responds to prescribed burns. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Undated Inciweb photo of the Pinal Fire.

A lightning-caused wildfire burning in the forested Pinal Mountains overlooking Globe in east-central Arizona continues to expand within a containment area projected by fire managers.

Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call Group/Getty Images

An Arizona senator wants to clarify whether President Trump’s recent federal hiring freeze extends to seasonal wildland firefighters. Republican Jeff Flake is concerned the U.S. Forest Service won’t have the necessary personnel this year. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


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