forest

Salt River Project

Arizona’s first attempt to generate electricity with a mix of biomass and coal will take place later this year, using debris from forest thinning projects in northern Arizona.


Melissa Sevigny

Ponderosa pine seedlings are more likely to sprout and thrive in mechanically thinned forests, a new study out of Flagstaff finds.


Melissa Sevigny

Almost 10,000 Christmas tree permits have been issued this season on national forest lands in northern Arizona. Getting into the holiday spirit can also help restore health to overstocked forests.


Melissa Sevigny

The Flagstaff Festival of Science begins today. People come from all over the world to experience the latest research on everything from Pluto to prehistoric plants. This year, the Festival features an art exhibit called Fires of Change. It’s the result of more than year of collaboration between scientists and artists who want to open up a new perspective about wildfire.

Brady Smith, U.S. Forest Service, Southwestern Region, Coconino National Forest

Current climate change models assume that trees recover swiftly after a drought ends. That’s not true, according to a new study.

Researchers examined tree-ring data from more than 1,300 sites around the world. By comparing the rings to rainfall records, they could track tree growth before, during, and after droughts.

They found most trees grow slower than normal for 1 to 4 years following a drought.

It’s called a “legacy effect,” and it hasn’t been included in climate change models.  

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