Glen Canyon

National Park Service

Here’s a fish story for you: what if you could get paid to go fishing all day? The National Park Service wants anglers to help get rid of exotic brown trout at Lees Ferry on the Colorado River. The agency is giving cash prizes for every fish to try to knock down their numbers. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, the program is an unusual experiment, designed to meet the goals of the Park Service but also respect the spiritual beliefs of the Zuni Tribe.

National Park Service

Lees Ferry on the Colorado River below Glen Canyon Dam is a world-famous rainbow trout fishery. But in recent years a different nonnative fish, the brown trout, has started to grow in numbers. The brown trout is a predatory fish that gobbles up not only the rainbows but also endangered native species in the Grand Canyon. Now, state and federal wildlife agencies have come up with a plan to reduce their numbers. They’re paying people to go fishing. Starting today, anglers can earn 25 dollars a head for catching and harvesting brown trout. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with Ken Hyde, chief of science at Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, about the new incentive program.


U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation is releasing higher-than-normal flows from Glen Canyon Dam this week, as part of an experiment to rebuild sandbars on the Colorado River. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Courtesy of Pat Talbott

In 1967 an artist named Robert Miller hand-carved a scale model of Glen Canyon. The enormous topographical map stood in the visitor center in Page for half a century, before it was dismantled and packed into storage. But a local artist decided to seize the chance to bring the map back to its former glory. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with Pat Talbott about the restoring the historic work of art, now on display at the Glen Canyon Natural History Association in Page.


U.S. Geological Survey

The Colorado River that runs through Grand Canyon National Park supplies water to nearly forty million people in the West. But longstanding programs to protect the river’s health are about to be defunded by the federal government. River managers say the result could be disastrous for the crown jewel of the national parks. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


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