health

nature.com

An outbreak of measles that began with an inmate at a federal detention center for immigrants in central Arizona has now grown to 11 confirmed cases.

Pinal County Health Services spokesman Joe Pyritz said Monday that seven of those infected are inmates at the Eloy Detention Center and four are workers at the facility.

State and county health officials say they're working to stop new transmissions by isolating patients, vaccinating people detained in the privately-run facility and trying to identify people who were at locations the four infected workers visited.

msmosquito.com

Fleas collected near a popular hiking area in Flagstaff have tested positive for plague.

The results are the first evidence of reported plague activity in Coconino County this year. But health officials say the disease is common and could be more widespread.

The positive samples came from areas near Interstate 40 and Butler Avenue.

Signs went up in the infected area and rodent burrows were treated to limit possible exposure. Humans and other animals can get the disease if they're bitten by an infected flea or come into direct contact with an infected animal.

Northern Arizona University will become a smoke- and tobacco-free campus beginning July 1.

NAU President Rita Cheng made the announcement Thursday.

She says the initiative reflects the school's strong commitment to wellness and public health and to create a healthy environment for students and staff.

Cheng says NAU's current policies prohibit smoking inside university buildings and vehicles.

But they don't address the health risks associated with secondhand smoke or the environmental issues caused by tobacco products.

Arizona health officials are gearing up to award dozens of additional licenses for medical marijuana dispensaries.

The Department of Health Services says the exact number of licenses that will be awarded isn't yet known but says there likely will be about 30 available when the state beings accepting applications this summer.

Arizona now has 99 licensed dispensaries and that 92 of those are open and operating.

According to the department, 97 percent of the state's residents live within 25 miles of an operating dispensary.

Raj Kamal / Stockbyte / Getty

University of Arizona researchers are working on a new initial treatment for venomous snakebites.

The College of Medicine says the product now awaiting a lengthy testing process would delay or prevent some of the most serious consequences of bites from rattlesnakes and other venomous snakes.

According to Dr. Vance Nielsen, the product could be stocked in ambulances or included in first-aid kids so that it'd be available when bite victims are far from medical care.

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