Indigeneous People

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It’s estimated that more than seven hundred thousand Native Americans in the U.S. are living without access to clean and reliable water.  A recent report from the Water & Tribes Initiative surveyed thirty tribes in the Colorado River Basin and found widespread problems with lack of water access and contaminated supplies. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with the report’s lead author, Heather Tanana, a Navajo Nation citizen and assistant professor at the University of Utah.

Navajo Nation Police Department

A bill is being introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives this week that would expand tribal jurisdiction over non-Native Americans on reservations. The effort is aimed at protecting children and responding police officers in domestic violence situations. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan

As several states in the American West face intense drought, water managers say it's shaping up to be a very difficult year for New Mexico farmers because of limited irrigation supplies. 

  

SELF Magazine

A recent survey shows three-quarters of Indigenous people in the U.S. are willing to consider getting a COVID-19 vaccine. That’s a higher acceptance rate than the general U.S. population, even though many Native people still feel concerns about safety and mistrust due to historical traumas. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke about the findings with Abigail Echo-Hawk, director of the Urban Indian Health Institute, which conducted the survey.


Deidra Peaches/Change Labs

The City of Flagstaff is hosting a virtual celebration today in honor of Indigenous Peoples' Day. Organizers of the event say it’s an opportunity for Native and non-Native people alike to understand the violent history of colonialism—and also envision a better future. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with two Diné speakers at today’s event, Rose Toehe and Carmenlita Chief.

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