Kaibab National Forest

Kaibab National Forest

One of northern and central Arizona’s most iconic tree species is in trouble. The shaggy bark juniper, known for its distinctive outer layers that appear to be shedding, has been dying off in significant numbers in recent years. 

The phenomenon was first documented in 2018. Since then, biologists estimate close to 100,000 acres of the conifers have perished between the communities of Paulden and Ash Fork, as well as north of Williams. Thirty percent of junipers in some areas have been wiped out. Others have turned a sickly brown.

Brady Smith/Coconino National Forest/Flickr

The Kaibab, Coconino and Apache-Sitgreaves national forests will lift all fire restrictions Friday at 6 a.m.

Prescott National Forest

The Prescott National Forest on Wednesday joined four other national forests in Arizona in lifting closures that generally barred public entry. 

  

Ryan Heinsius / KNAU

The Coconino and Kaibab national forests have reopened to the public after fully closing two weeks ago because of extreme fire danger.

Ryan Heinsius / KNAU

Crews continue to demobilize as firefighting efforts wind down on the 78,000-acre Rafael Fire. More than 70% of the blaze has now been contained. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Ryan Heinsius / KNAU

Firefighters are reporting continued progress battling the 77,000-acre Rafael Fire near Flagstaff. They’ve contained nearly half the blaze ahead of predicted monsoon rains that could decrease wildfire danger in the area. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


Yavapai County Sheriff's Office

The Rafael Fire burning southwest of Flagstaff has grown to 36,000 acres with no containment yet reported. It comes as a federal incident management team has assumed command amid continued extreme wildfire conditions. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

  

  

Ryan Heinsius / KNAU

The Apache-Sitgreaves National Forests fully closed to all visitors Thursday morning because of extreme fire danger and limited firefighting resources.

Yavapai County Sheriff's Office

Officials say the Rafael Fire burning southwest of Flagstaff could have grown to as many as 35,000 acres Tuesday with no containment yet reported. Crews, however, weren’t able to generate an accurate infrared map because of cloud cover Tuesday night. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


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