Ponderosa Forests

Melissa Sevigny

A new study from Northern Arizona University looks at the long-term effects of restoring a forest with mechanical thinning and prescribed burns. The news is good: treated forests are healthier and more resistant to catastrophic wildfires, and those benefits seem to last. But climate change adds a wild card. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with forest ecologist Mike Stoddard about the findings.


Courtesy of ERI

The main architect of northern Arizona’s Four Forest Restoration Initiative is set to retire later this month. Wally Covington, a forestry professor at Northern Arizona University, has been a pioneer of modern forest management for more than five decades. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


USDA Forest Service photograph

Ten miles north of Flagstaff is the oldest experimental forest in the United States. It was established more than 100 years ago at a time when foresters wanted to know how to encourage ponderosa pines to grow. Now, scientists use Fort Valley to study the opposite problem: how to thin the overcrowded woods. It took decades of research to bring about that shift in thinking. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, it all started with one man and two mules.

Melissa Sevigny

A report from a nonprofit institute says forest restoration initiatives generated $150 million dollars for northern Arizona’s economy in 2017. The study was conducted to meet a Congressional requirement for monitoring the results of large-scale restoration projects. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.

U.S. Forest Service, Coconino National Forest

A new study from Northern Arizona University shows the area burned by wildfires in Arizona and New Mexico has increased by about twenty thousand acres annually since the mid-eighties. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


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