Prescribed burns

Grand Canyon National Park on Facebook

Various Northern Arizona national forests plan to conduct prescribed burns in the coming week.

Melissa Sevigny

It’s common now to see smoke in the air around Northern Arizona in the fall. Prescribed burns have become the norm for managing forests—especially around Flagstaff, which is a national model for forest management in an age of megafires. But nationwide, there’s a shortage of people qualified to do those burns, and funding is limited. The Nature Conservancy is trying to fill that gap by offering training for future “Burn Bosses.”  KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Grand Canyon National Park on Facebook

The first of four prescribed burn projects on the Coconino National Forest in the Flagstaff area got underway Thursday.

Melissa Sevigny

A new study by The Nature Conservancy shows forest thinning and prescribed burns cause a short-term loss of carbon to the atmosphere, but save carbon in the long run. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, that’s because healthy forests have bigger trees and experience fewer catastrophic wildfires.


flickr.com

You may have noticed some pockets of smoke in the air around northern Arizona.

Fire managers on the South Zone of the Kaibab National Forest say they will continue operations on multiple prescribed fire projects on both the Williams and Tusayan Ranger Districts over the next several days. The burns could extend into next week as conditions remain favorable for beneficial prescribed fire treatments.