Science and Innovation

Arizona Department of Health Services

More than three and a half million people have received a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine in Arizona, but only sixteen percent of those are Hispanic or Latino, even though that group is a third of the state’s population. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports on a research study being conducted by the three state universities to investigate the lagging numbers.


Scott Berger/Associated Press

Airport officials in some western states are concerned sporadic fuel shortages may hamper aerial firefighting operations. Planes and helicopters are critical in fighting wildfires raging across the West. Fire managers, however, say the problem is not widespread…or new. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Melissa Sevigny

Streets in east Flagstaff filled with mud and debris this week as flash floods poured down from the Museum Fire scar. The two-year-old burn scar is a study site for scientists at Northern Arizona University, who want to know how forests will recover from wildfires in a warmer, drier climate. Just before the flooding, KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny took a tour of the spot to learn about the experiment.


Rafael Fire Information Facebook page

The recent Rafael Fire in Sycamore Canyon destroyed two historic cabins and damaged several other cultural heritage sites. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Victoria Girgis, Lowell Observatory

A new kind of broadband internet is coming to Tuba City on the Navajo Nation, one beamed down from space by so-called “satellite constellations.” This technology can provide much-needed internet access in rural areas. But it comes with a dilemma. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, the new satellites are so bright and so numerous, astronomers worry about the future of the night sky. 

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