scott thybony

Scott Thybony's Canyon Commentary: Healing

Apr 29, 2020
Scott Thybony

KNAU commentator Scott Thybony always spends a lot of time outdoors, but that’s been especially true of the last 6 weeks during the COVID-19 pandemic. Scott’s been walking canyon rims, volcano craters and hollowed-out cliffs filled with rock art images. In between hikes, he’s been writing. And in this week’s Canyon Commentary, Scott reflects on his recovery from encephalitis many years ago, drawing some parallels to the current situation. He says being able to connect with others was part of the healing process.

Scott Thybony's Canyon Commentary: Road To Nowhere

Feb 6, 2020
Shutterstock

Most roads take you somewhere. But the Southwest is filled with a lot of roads that lead nowhere in particular. Commentator Scott Thybony has acquired a taste for them and recounts a recent road trip to one of his favorite destinations on the Colorado Plateau…nowhere.

Erik Thybony

Driving on Highway 89 across the Navajo Nation, you're likely to see the giant art installations of Chip Thomas painted on abandoned water tanks and trading posts. Thomas, a physician, has lived and worked on the Reservation for more than 30 years. Under his street artist name, Jetsonorama, he creates large scale murals that tell stories of Indigenous people. In KNAU's latest Canyon Commentary, writer Scott Thybony shares the experience of introducing his son to Thomas' work on a recent road trip; in particular, to a m ural called 'The Green Room.'

Scott Thybony's Canyon Commentary: The Naturalist

Oct 1, 2019
Google Images

A stand of bear-clawed aspen trees on the San Francisco Peaks is the jumping off point for this month’s Canyon Commentary by Scott Thybony. It was the base camp of naturalist C. Hart Merriam in the late 1800’s. He was working on a groundbreaking project: studying the distribution patterns of plants and animals from the bottom of the Grand Canyon to the top of Humphrey’s Peak. Merriam called them ‘Life Zones’, the boundaries which reflect climate and ecological variation in mountains, deserts, rivers and canyons. They are still used today to assess how ecosystems respond to a changing climate.

Scott Thybony

There is a long-standing tradition in Arizona of literary pilgrimages. People journey to Walnut Canyon where Willa Cather gathered inspiration for her 1915 novel ‘Song of the Lark’. Others belly up to the bar at The Weatherford Hotel in Flagstaff where Zane Grey wrote ‘The Call of the Canyon’ in an upstairs room in 1923. And some venture to the North Rim Lookout Tower where Edward Abbey worked as a fire scout in the early 1970’s, filling up journal after journal with observations and musings. Scott Thybony made his own pilgrimage to the tower for his latest Canyon Commentary.


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