Sustainable Communities Program at NAU

hispanickitchen.com

Kitchens all over the Southwest this time of year are filled with the irresistible scent of tamales steaming on the stove.

This Earth Note originally aired on KNAU December 25th, 2019.

Getty Images

There’s a movement in Flagstaff to change the name of a downtown street with a controversial moniker. City officials are considering several community proposals to rethink Agassiz St. It was named after Louis Agassiz, an influential 19th century biologist and Harvard professor. But his legacy is one of racism.


Sandra Pascoe Ortiz

Fans of the prickly pear cactus might be familiar with recipes for cactus jelly, cactus candy, and fried cactus pads or nopalitos. But how about a recipe for a biodegradable plastic bag?


John Blaustein

Floating down the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon can be a leisurely, relaxing experience. But for a handful of river runners, speed is the real objective.


nau.edu

Biocrust is a vital, but fragile material that covers a good portion of the soil surface on the Colorado Plateau. This “living skin” is a complex concoction of cyanobacteria, algae, fungi, moss and lichen.


Josh Langdon/Kachina Peaks Avalanche Center

When a warm storm front moves over a snow-capped mountain range, floods often follow. These events aren’t common on the Colorado Plateau, where winter precipitation usually falls as snow. But scientists say that’s going to change as the world continues to heat up. 


The National Geographic Society

Anyone attempting to map the Grand Canyon faces a big job. It is immense in size, intricate in topography, and not easy to get around in.


Earth Notes: Owlflies

Feb 5, 2020
Wikimedia Commons/Charlie Jackson

Owlflies first appeared in the fossil record during the late Jurassic period, about 150 million years ago. They look like a cross between a butterfly and a dragonfly and are often mistaken for the latter.


Ryan Heinsius / KNAU

Changes in global markets have led to a lot of confusion about what can and can’t be recycled these days.


Sam Swartley/audubon.com

Catch sight of a small bird with narrow wings and a long square-tipped tail, hovering beside a road or perched on a telephone wire, and you’ve likely seen an American kestrel.


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