wildlife

Judi Rochford

Forensic scientists (at least on TV shows) collect DNA to figure out who was at the scene of a crime. What if you could use the same technique to discover when a mountain lion crossed a river or what kind of fish live in a lake? A team at Embry Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott is working on that idea as a new, faster way to survey wildlife. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.

Wade Ward, APS

Millions of birds are killed every year by electrical power lines—especially in the wide-open country of the Colorado Plateau where power lines and poles are often all that’s available for birds to nest and roost on.

nps.gov

Environmental groups have asked a judge to stop a plan to replace existing vehicle barriers along the U.S.-Mexico border in southern Arizona.

Arizona Game and Fish Department

The Arizona Game and Fish Department put radio collars on twenty mule deer near the San Francisco Peaks north of Flagstaff, to track their movements over the next three years. The data will identify wildlife corridors where deer travel from one place to another, and may eventually lead to highway projects that create safer roads for both drivers and deer. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with biologist Jeff Gagnon about the federally funded experiment.


Jason Wilder

Northern Arizona University biologist Jason Wilder made a grisly discovery recently: a plant that ensnares and kills birds.

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