wildlife

Brian Wooldridge, USFWS

Mohave rattlesnakes are armed with a powerful weapon—venom that can immobilize or kill their prey. People have believed the Mohave’s venom held a neurotoxin, a cocktail of enzymes and peptides that paralyze the nervous system—making a bite from this snake especially deadly.


outdoorwarrior.com

Twenty mule deer near Flagstaff have been outfitted with collars to study their movement.

The Arizona Game and Fish Department captured and collared the deer last month around the San Francisco Peaks. Biologists are using data from the collars to learn more about the daily and seasonal movement of the deer.

Traffic engineers and wildlife officials say the information will help guide planning for future road projects to avoid collisions between vehicles and the animals, and to protect the deer's habitat.

NPS/Nathan Kostegian

Wildlife advocates are seeking a court order that would force U.S. officials to consider if grizzly bears should be restored to more Western states following the animals' resurgence in the Northern Rockies.

blm.gov

A Mohave County official is calling the overpopulation of burros in the Black Mountain herd management area a crisis.

Endangered Wolf Center on Facebook

 A dozen Mexican gray wolf pups are being raised by wild packs in Arizona and New Mexico as biologists mark another season of playing matchmaker to bolster the genetics of the endangered species.

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