wildlife

D.C. Lightfoot/UNM

A rapidly changing climate means there’s no longer a “typical” year on the Colorado Plateau. That’s confirmed by a long-term study of bugs in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico.


reporterherald.com

Coconino County authorities say a Flagstaff-area skunk tested positive for rabies.

Dave Keelinghttps/floridamuseum.ufl.edu

It’s well known that extracting natural gas for fuel contributes to global warming. But animals that live where these resources are mined face another problem: excessive noise.


Earth Notes: Halloween Tarantulas

Oct 30, 2019
www.wildrepublic.com

If you’ve been out hiking the last few weeks, you may have seen one of the Colorado Plateau’s scariest-looking residents. Male tarantulas are on the move from late summer through fall, on a quest to find mates.


Heber Wild Horses Freedom Preservation Alliance

 It will take $5 billion and 15 years to get an overpopulation of wild horses under control on federal lands across the West, the acting head of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management said Wednesday, adding that several developments have made him more optimistic about his agency's ability to get the job done.

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