Science and Innovation

NAU

Physicists have found a way to transfer information faster and in larger volumes than ever before through the use of light and sound. 


In the 19th century the United States was not yet a nation of scientists. But when a total solar eclipse swept the western frontier in 1878, astronomers rushed to prove they could make a mark on the world with new inventions and startling discoveries. Eclipse chaser and former NPR correspondent David Baron tells that story in his latest book American Eclipse. He spoke with KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny.


Bonnie Stevens

Twin Arrows Navajo Casino Resort has deployed a unique security officer—nearly five tall, 400 pounds, and fully automated. The Knightscope K5 ADM or Autonomous Data Machine is the first security robot in Arizona. It looks like a taller version of “Star Wars’” R2 D2, and makes space music sounds as it rolls around the parking lot at three miles per hour.


Courtesy of Lucky Lenny

Tonight Flagstaff kicks off a yearlong party leading up to next year’s 50th anniversary of the first Apollo moon landing. Every astronaut who ever walked on the Moon spent time training here. Part of tonight’s celebration is a performance by the band Lucky Lenny. They will perform a bluegrass version of Pink Floyd’s “The Dark Side of the Moon.”  In the latest installment of Eats and Beats, we hear musician Shawn Dennehy talk about reimagining the iconic 1973 album.


USGS Astrogeology Science Center

Forty-nine years ago tomorrow, Apollo astronauts landed on the Moon. But first they came to Flagstaff to train. Friday night the city is launching a yearlong celebration of Flagstaff’s role in the lunar missions. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with local geologist and historian Rich Kozak about that legacy.


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