Melissa Sevigny

Science & Technology Reporter

Melissa grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where she fell in love with the ecology and geology of the Sonoran desert. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona and an M.FA. in Creative Writing and Environment from Iowa State University. Her first book, Mythical River, forthcoming from the University of Iowa Press, is about water issues in the Southwest. She has worked as a science communicator for NASA’s Phoenix Mars Scout Mission, the Water Resources Research Center, and the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Melissa relocated to Flagstaff in 2015 to join KNAU’s team. She enjoys hiking, fishing and reading fantasy novels.

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Melissa Sevigny

The U.S. House and Senate have passed an appropriations bill that will restore full funding to environmental programs on the Colorado River for the next fiscal year. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, the programs were at risk of closing after the White House redirected their funding.

Courtesy of Pat Talbott

In 1967 an artist named Robert Miller hand-carved a scale model of Glen Canyon. The enormous topographical map stood in the visitor center in Page for half a century, before it was dismantled and packed into storage. But a local artist decided to seize the chance to bring the map back to its former glory. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with Pat Talbott about the restoring the historic work of art, now on display at the Glen Canyon Natural History Association in Page.


Jim Clark, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Some ecologists and activists argue the endangered Mexican gray wolf should be reintroduced further north in Arizona to increase the population. But a new study coauthored by the Arizona Game and Fish Department says expanding the range would harm recovery efforts. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

A new study says streamflow in the Colorado River has decreased by about 15 percent in the last century. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports higher temperatures are the primary reason.


U.S. Forest Service Northern Research Station

A study by a Flagstaff scientist found climate change will likely lengthen the growing season in forests—but paradoxically, trees may suffer more from frost. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.

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