Melissa Sevigny

Science & Technology Reporter

Melissa grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where she fell in love with the ecology and geology of the Sonoran desert. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona and an M.FA. in Creative Writing and Environment from Iowa State University. Her first book, Mythical River, forthcoming from the University of Iowa Press, is about water issues in the Southwest. She has worked as a science communicator for NASA’s Phoenix Mars Scout Mission, the Water Resources Research Center, and the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Melissa relocated to Flagstaff in 2015 to join KNAU’s team. She enjoys hiking, fishing and reading fantasy novels.

Ways to Connect

NASA/Bill Ingalls

The Perseid meteor shower peaks this weekend, coinciding with the new moon. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports on how to see it. 

Melissa Sevigny

Household water use has declined in the United States for the last two decades, mainly due to updated plumbing codes and more efficient toilets and dishwashers. But trading in a green lawn isn’t so easy. That’s why a lot of western cities are offering money for people to get rid of their grass.  KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports on Flagstaff’s revamped incentive program.

NASA/Pat Rawlings

A new study coauthored by a Flagstaff scientist suggests it’s not possible to terraform Mars with current technology to make it hospitable for people. It all comes down to the carbon dioxide. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


In the 19th century the United States was not yet a nation of scientists. But when a total solar eclipse swept the western frontier in 1878, astronomers rushed to prove they could make a mark on the world with new inventions and startling discoveries. Eclipse chaser and former NPR correspondent David Baron tells that story in his latest book American Eclipse. He spoke with KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny.


Courtesy of Lucky Lenny

Tonight Flagstaff kicks off a yearlong party leading up to next year’s 50th anniversary of the first Apollo moon landing. Every astronaut who ever walked on the Moon spent time training here. Part of tonight’s celebration is a performance by the band Lucky Lenny. They will perform a bluegrass version of Pink Floyd’s “The Dark Side of the Moon.”  In the latest installment of Eats and Beats, we hear musician Shawn Dennehy talk about reimagining the iconic 1973 album.


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