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Arizona court won't halt sex suits naming Boy Scouts, others

Robert Brutinel
AP Photo/Matt York, File
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Arizona Supreme Court Chief Justice Robert M. Brutinel speaks during oral arguments, in Phoenix on April 20, 2021. Arizona victims of long-ago child sex abuse can proceed with lawsuits against groups like the Boy Scouts of America following a recent decision by the state Supreme Court that rejected claims that a 2019 state law extending victims' right to sue was unconstitutional.

An Arizona Supreme Court decision means victims of long-ago child sex abuse can proceed with lawsuits against groups like the Boy Scouts of America.

The court refused to overturn lower court rulings that found a 2019 law creating a one-time window for victims to sue is constitutional.

Big Brothers Big Sisters of America and its southern and central Arizona affiliates are being sued by two men who allege their “Big Brothers” abused them in the 1970s and 1980s.

The group said the new law violated their due process rights by changing the statute of limitations, but trial court judges disagreed.

The Supreme Court last week refused to overturn those decisions. Phoenix attorney Robert Pastor says he can now try to prove Big Brothers Big Sisters was negligent.