Science and Innovation

CDC

Antibodies are an immune response that linger in the blood of people who’ve recovered from a disease. That’s also how vaccines work—they teach the body how to produce those antibodies so it’s ready the next time the disease comes around. There’s no vaccine for COVID-19 yet, but scientists have developed blood tests that can identify antibodies against coronavirus. In KNAU’s weekly update on the science of COIVD-19, Melissa Sevigny spoke with infectious disease expert Dr. Paul Keim about why these antibody tests matter for public health, and what it means when the results say someone is “sero-positive.” 

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It’s the time of year when young birds have hatched and are about to try their wings. But those newborns can be vulnerable to high winds, predators, or injury that force them from the nest before they’re fully prepared.

The Coconino and Kaibab National Forests have entered stage two fire restrictions. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, fire crews are preparing for an above-average wildfire season in Arizona.

Brady Smith, U.S. Forest Service, Southwestern Region, Coconino National Forest

A memo published today by Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue directs the U.S. Forest Service to increase mining, grazing, and recreation on public lands. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Cases of the coronavirus disease continue to rise in Arizona and the country. New research shows just a small fraction of sick individuals might be responsible for the majority of new cases. In KNAU’s weekly update on the science of COVID-19, Melissa Sevigny speaks with infectious disease expert Dr. Paul Keim about these so-called “super-spreader events” and what they mean for controlling the pandemic.


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