Diane Hope

Sam Swartley/audubon.com

Catch sight of a small bird with narrow wings and a long square-tipped tail, hovering beside a road or perched on a telephone wire, and you’ve likely seen an American kestrel.


manufacturing.net/Cortez Journal

Utes have occupied land in the southwest corner of Colorado for centuries. Now their food heritage is sowing seeds of prosperity for members of the Ute Mountain Tribe.


D.C. Lightfoot/UNM

A rapidly changing climate means there’s no longer a “typical” year on the Colorado Plateau. That’s confirmed by a long-term study of bugs in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico.


U.S. Forest Service

The Colorado Plateau is a place often thirsty for rain. But some of the soils in the region are water-phobic.


Diane Hope

In recent decades northern leopard frogs have become refugees in their own land.

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