Melissa Sevigny

Science & Technology Reporter

Melissa grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where she fell in love with the ecology and geology of the Sonoran desert. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona and an M.FA. in Creative Writing and Environment from Iowa State University. Her first book, Mythical River, forthcoming from the University of Iowa Press, is about water issues in the Southwest. She has worked as a science communicator for NASA’s Phoenix Mars Scout Mission, the Water Resources Research Center, and the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Melissa relocated to Flagstaff in 2015 to join KNAU’s team. She enjoys hiking, fishing and reading fantasy novels.

Ways to Connect

Don Graham/WikiCommons

The Navajo Nation faces a housing crisis. Many homes don’t have electricity or running water, and large families share small spaces with few options for isolating if someone gets sick with COVID-19. Carmirae Holguin has started a new nonprofit to address these issues and revitalize traditional building practices. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with her about the Nááts'íilid Initiative.


NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

An Arizona-led spacecraft mission begins its journey back to Earth today after successfully scooping up a sample of an asteroid. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Arizona Department of Water Resources

Governor Doug Ducey signed legislation this week to establish new clean water rules, following a rollback of federal protections for ephemeral waterways last year. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.

Melissa Sevigny

Public health guidelines say to avoid crowded indoor spaces during the pandemic. But as schools reopen and people head back to the office, experts are looking for ways to measure how risky it is to share space and air with others. Scientists at Northern Arizona University are trying out an idea: simple carbon dioxide sensors in classrooms and science labs around campus. There’s even one here at KNAU. Science reporter Melissa Sevigny spoke with biologist George Koch to learn more about the project and hear our results.


Verde Valley Seed Library

New libraries are popping up all over the country—but they don’t have any books. They’re libraries for seeds.

At the Verde Valley Seed Library in Cottonwood, anyone can borrow five packets of seeds, take them home, and plant them. After the harvest, borrowers bring back fresh packets of seeds collected from their tomatoes, pumpkins and beans. It’s not just a way to exchange free seeds among neighbors. The library is a repository of heirloom seeds, protecting the fast-vanishing biodiversity of food crops.

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