kayenta mine

Melissa Sevigny

The Kayenta coal mine in northeastern Arizona shut down last year, along with the power plant it supplied. Coal from that mine used to light up Las Vegas and Los Angeles and supply the electricity to pump water to Phoenix and Tucson. Those cities have been able to turn to other sources of energy. Not so on the Hopi and Navajo Nations. For decades tribal members relied on Kayenta coal to heat their homes, and now it’s their first winter without reliable or affordable fuel. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports on what Hopi community leaders call a devastating crisis.

Doc Searls/Wikimedia Commons

Peabody Energy will lay off nearly its entire workforce at the Kayenta Mine this month as it prepares to close the site. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, coal industry critics say the company is abandoning local communities.


Peabody Energy/Wikimedia Commons

Almost all of the workers at the Kayenta Mine on the Navajo Nation are facing layoffs in the coming weeks. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, Peabody Energy will cease operations as its sole coal customer, the Navajo Generating Station, is also slated to close.


usu.edu

A Navajo Nation company has ended its bid to buy a coal-fired power plant on the reservation and the mine that feeds it.

Mark Henle/The Arizona Republic

Advocacy groups on the Navajo Nation have filed an intent to sue Peabody Energy. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, they say the company is trying to avoid paying millions for environmental reclamation of a coal mine set to close later this year.


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