Mexican Spotted Owl

audubon.org

A nonprofit environmental group has negotiated a truce with federal agencies after a long-running lawsuit over the threatened Mexican Spotted Owl. WildEarth Guardians sued the U.S. Forest Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 2013, saying the agencies failed to monitor owl populations in Southwestern forests and assess the effects of thinning and burning. The new agreement promises to remedy that on all eleven national forests in Arizona and New Mexico. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with John Horning, executive director of WildEarth Guardians.

National Park Service

An environmental group has agreed to drop a lawsuit after reaching an agreement with federal and state agencies about how to handle forest thinning projects in the habitat of the Mexican Spotted Owl. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Shaula Hedwall

The Museum Fire burned nearly two thousand acres north of Flagstaff last July. The area is home to a federally threatened species, the Mexican Spotted Owl, and the fire affected three patches of habitat set aside for them, called Protected Activity Centers. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with two wildlife biologists about how the owls are doing now, Shaula Hedwall of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Julia Camps of the Coconino National Forest.

Agencies Seek End To Forest Rulings In Arizona, New Mexico

Dec 30, 2019
abcbirds.org

Federal agencies have filed opinions for national forests in Arizona and New Mexico and have asked a judge to dismiss the court’s previous ruling on timber management activities on Mexican Spotted Owl habitat land.

Blue Spruce Begins Journey To U.S. Capitol For Holiday Celebrations

Nov 8, 2019
(Roberto E. Rosales/The Albuquerque Journal via AP)

A 60-foot blue spruce tree is on its way to the U.S. Capitol in Washington. It was cut down Wednesday during a ceremony in a forested canyon in northern New Mexico, starting a 2½-week journey that will take it to the Capitol to be this year’s Christmas tree.

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