Biology

Grand Canyon National Park / Erin Whittaker

Low, steady releases of water from Glen Canyon Dam are taking place this spring and summer as an experiment to increase aquatic insects on the Colorado River. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, these “bug flows” benefit the river’s ecology and might even help anglers catch more fish.


U.S. Forest Service, Coconino National Forest

Scientists at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott are working on a new way to survey wildlife—by collecting DNA from streams and rivers. It’s less expensive and less stressful to animals than traditional survey methods. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Melanie Fischer / USFWS

A new scientific report says the razorback sucker is on its way to recovery. The report recommends “downlisting” the Colorado River fish from endangered to threatened. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

A new study says endangered razorback suckers upstream of Lake Powell may struggle to migrate up the San Juan River to spawn. The fish are blocked by a waterfall that formed two decades ago when the river changed its course. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports. 


Melissa Sevigny

Some people collect pinyon pine nuts this time of year for a tasty autumn treat. Others sell them for extra income. But Catherine Gehring of Northern Arizona University goes nut-gathering every September for a different reason. She researches ways pinyon pines survive drought—at a time when a hotter, drier climate is predicted to drive the trees out of Arizona entirely. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with her in the woodlands east of Flagstaff.

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