New Mexico

endangeredwolfcenter.org

Two endangered Mexican wolves have been removed from the wild and are undergoing testing to determine if they're behind a string of livestock deaths in southwestern New Mexico, marking the latest wrinkle in the strained effort to return the predators to the American Southwest.

U.S. Forest Service, Coconino National Forest

A new study from Northern Arizona University shows the area burned by wildfires in Arizona and New Mexico has increased by about twenty thousand acres annually since the mid-eighties. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Chicago Zoological Society

Mexican gray wolves were once common throughout the southwest United States and into central Mexico. But their populations were decimated in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries as human settlement exploded. Prey decline, habitat degradation, and federal predator control programs all but wiped out the animals. By the 1970s, Mexican wolves had almost completely disappeared from the wild.


ABQ BioPark website

Albuquerque's zoo has received another Mexican gray wolf as part of an international recovery effort that includes breeding the endangered animals in captivity to ensure their genetic viability.

A New Mexico rancher who trapped an endangered Mexican gray wolf and hit it with a shovel says he will appeal the loss of his grazing permit.

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