Flagstaff Watershed Protection Project

Neal Chapman, TNC

For some, autumn means celebrating by raising a glass of a crisp lager or October ale. But the Nature Conservancy wants patrons of local breweries to know you can’t have beer without a healthy forest.

Melissa Sevigny

How much would you pay to restore the forest around you? A new economic study says the better your view, the tighter your purse strings. Researchers at Northern Arizona University surveyed Flagstaff residents and discovered people who can see the San Francisco Peaks from their house are less willing to pay for forest restoration projects meant to protect the town from catastrophic wildfires. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny spoke with the study’s lead author, Julie Mueller.


Melissa Sevigny

Forests in northern Arizona have a problem: massive piles of wood chips left behind from thinning projects. They can’t stay in the forest because of the fire danger and there’s no local market for them. But they have to go somewhere. A new experiment is testing the idea of burning them along with coal to generate electricity. It’s not easy to do, but if contractors can sell wood chips to power plants, that could speed up forest restoration.


Ryan Heinsius

A new phase of mechanical tree thinning launched this week on the Coconino National Forest. It’s part of the Flagstaff Watershed Protection Project to help prevent catastrophic wildfire. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, crews are constructing almost four miles of logging roads. 


Ryan Heinsius

Officials with the U.S. Forest Service and the City of Flagstaff have signed off on the final draft of the Flagstaff Watershed Protection Project. It’s designed to thin National Forest land surrounding the city and safeguard it from the effects of catastrophic wildfire. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


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