Colorado Plateau

Arizona State Museum Photograph Collection, University of Arizona

By the turn of the 20th century, few Anglos had laid eyes on many of the Southwest’s natural wonders. Knowledge of Rainbow Bridge, Monument Valley and what would eventually become Zion National Park remained mostly with area tribes. Archaeological sites like Mesa Verde in southwest Colorado were also largely unexcavated.

Bruce Pavlik/the-journal.com

Stone metates at an archeological site in Utah still bear faint traces of the native Four Corners potato. It’s the leftovers from a meal that happened more than 10,000 years ago.


D.C. Lightfoot/UNM

A rapidly changing climate means there’s no longer a “typical” year on the Colorado Plateau. That’s confirmed by a long-term study of bugs in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico.


Earth Notes: Halloween Tarantulas

Oct 30, 2019
www.wildrepublic.com

If you’ve been out hiking the last few weeks, you may have seen one of the Colorado Plateau’s scariest-looking residents. Male tarantulas are on the move from late summer through fall, on a quest to find mates.


Ryan Heinsius / KNAU

About 30 miles north of Flagstaff sits one of the region’s most magnificent-yet-perplexing geological features. Red Mountain is a cinder cone that formed nearly 750,000 years ago in the San Francisco Volcanic Field. 


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