garden

Melissa Sevigny

Not many vegetables have a Facebook page at all, let alone with nearly 19,000 followers, but “Glass Gem” corn is special. Its translucent, rainbow-colored kernels made it an Internet sensation. Growers of this heritage crop say Glass Gem has inspired thousands of people to get involved with seed-saving and reconnect with ancient foodways. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny tells the story of how this unique corn made its way from Oklahoma to Cornville, Arizona—and from there, to the world.


Gardening is part of the curriculum at The STAR School on the western edge of the Navajo Nation. The pre- K  through-8th grade school is an off-grid, solar-powered charter school and one of few schools in Northern Arizona that is certified to serve its own student-grown produce in the cafeteria. In the latest segment of Eats and Beats, stories about food and music, KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports it’s a way to get kids excited about science, nature…and even eating their vegetables.

U.S. Forest Service

The Colorado Plateau is a place often thirsty for rain. But some of the soils in the region are water-phobic.


Earth Notes: Certified School Garden

Aug 28, 2019
FUSD

Studies show that kids who garden perform better in science, eat healthier and develop a strong sense of social and emotional well-being. But the harvests of school gardens often can’t be served in the cafeteria because of health codes. A Farm-to-School initiative in Arizona aims to change that by allowing harvests from school gardens and locally grown foods to be used in campus meal programs.


Melissa Sevigny

It’s harvest season and gardeners in Arizona are roasting homegrown squash and canning extra tomatoes. But how do they know their vegetables are safe to eat? It’s a worry in some small mining towns with a legacy of contamination. In central Arizona, local gardeners have teamed up with scientists to test their soil and rainwater. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.

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