Zac Ziegler

Route 66 was once the Mother Road of America, bringing tourists and travelers to small towns along the path from Chicago to Los Angeles. But, as the road was replaced by Interstate 40, many towns lost those visitors and still struggle to stay afloat. 

It’s been two and a half years since Arizona voters approved a gradual increase in the state’s minimum wage to $12 an hour, and examination by a centrist think tank shows growing pay is benefiting at least one traditionally low-wage industry.

leeequities.com

Coconino County is the least affordable county in Arizona for renters. That’s according to an annual report from the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

In Flagstaff--the county’s main population base—there are about 29,000 homes, but only about 2,100 are set aside for low-income housing.

Combine that with an abnormally high number of renters, and you’ve got a housing shortage for renters, according to Andrew Aurand, Vice President of the National Low Income Housing Coalition. He spoke with KNAU’s Zac Ziegler about the latest report.

KNAU/Zac Ziegler

This week, we're running a series of interviews called Bearing Witness: Voices of Climate Change. They're stories told by longtime Arizonans about changes they've seen in the familiar landscapes of their lives. While personal experience, in and of itself, is not scientific conclusion, many researchers believe long-term observation is a critical component to understanding how climate change affects humanity and the planet. Doug Von Gausig is the fourth-term Mayor of Clarkdale and has spent much of his life in Yavapai County. He is also the head of the Verde River Institute, a group dedicated to ensuring the health of one of the largest perennial streams in Arizona. From the banks of the Verde, Von Gausig talks about the river he grew up with. 

KNAU/Ryan Heinsius

This week, we begin a series of interviews called Bearing Witness: Voices of Climate Change. They're stories told by longtime Arizonans about changes they've seen in the familiar landscapes of their lives: Watering holes gone dry, food sources vanished, tribal customs changed because of drought. Personal experience, in and of itself itself, is not scientific conclusion. But, many researchers believe long-term observation is a critical component to understanding how climate change affects humanity and the planet. In this segment, we hear from lifelong Flagstaff resident, Jim Babbitt. His family came to the area in the late 1800's when the population was only about 600. They bought ranch land and cattle to graze it, and over the next 100-plus years, became a ranching dynasty, as well as a family of conservationists and stewards of the West. Here, Jim Babbitt remembers local watering holes and streams in Flagstaff that aren't what they used to be, including the Frances Short Pond. It was created by the Arizona Railway as a storage reservoir. 

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